MODIFICATION OF ANGLE SETTINGS 
Tuesday, March 25, 2008, 11:21 PM - MODIFICATION OF ANGLE SETTINGS
Posted by Administrator
MODIFICATION OF ANGLE SETTINGS FOR AEROMATIC PROPELLER



In some cases customers are having trouble getting their Aeromatic adjusted for optimum performance. The angle changes are set by the factory and are not something the user in the field is able to do. Any propeller shop should have the necessary tools to perform these changes.



The reason for this information is an attempt to save the customer expenses of shipping the propeller back to Tarver Propeller, LLC. We have the developed angle setting for many of the certified airplanes that were equipped with the Aeromatic propeller. But when the Aeromatic propeller is installed on a different engine/airplane combination, one or more angles may have to be changed. This information is intended to provide the user with the necessary technical date that he can supply to the propeller shop if that be the case.



A summary for print can be found here:

OPERATIONS AND LIMITATIONS INSTRUCTIONS No. 101



This technical information is supplementary in nature. In other words the Aeromatic propeller will already be set up for your airplane/engine combination at the factory. This data will be sufficient to modify one or more angles in order to obtain the best performance.



The Installation and Operations instructions that you get with the propeller details the adjustments that can be performed by the user, namely the low pitch full throttle static rpm. This is a mechanical stop and is adjustable by the user. Also the amount of counterweights are field adjustable by the user. The following data is provided in order to make possible necessary other adjustments.



Here is the ideal way that it should work. The first check is to verify that the static rpm is correct. Then install the counterweights that were supplied with the propeller and do the full throttle low altitude speed run. If everything is correct then the full throttle speed run will be within 50 rpm of the rated engine rpm that was recorder when the static rpm check was made.



Once static rpm has been adjusted it will not need any further adjustment. This is important. DO NOT go back and change static rpm.



The following conditions and corrections are described with the counterweights installed.



Problem 1. Figure 1 below. Full Throttle Best Climb airspeed and full throttle level flight rpm are both too high - ADD counterweight to both arms. See Note 1 below. (User can do)





Problem 2. Figure 2 below. Full Throttle Best Climb airspeed rpm is about right and full throttle level flight rpm is too low - REMOVE counterweight FROM both arms. See Note 1 below. (user can do)





Problem 3. Figure 3 below. Full Throttle Best Climb airspeed rpm is too low (more than 50 rpm) and full throttle level flight rpm is too high (over engine red line or max continuous rpm). LOWER Counterweight arm angle and add more counterweight. See Note 1 and 2 below. (Prop shop can do)





Problem 4. Figure 4 below. Full Throttle Best Climb airspeed rpm is too high, full throttle level flight rpm about right - INCREASE COUNTERWEIGHT angle and remove weight. See notes 1 and 2 below. (Prop shop can do)





Problem 5. Figure 5 below. Full throttle best climb airspeed rpm too high and full throttle level flight rpm is also too high - ADD weight. See note 1 below. (User can do)





Problem 6. Figure 6 below. Full throttle best climb airspeed rpm too low and full throttle level flight rpm is also too low - REMOVE weight. See note 1 below. (User can do)





NOTE 1: 0.25 oz (-1) = about 25 rpm, 0.5 (-2) oz = about 50 rpm, 1.0 oz (-3)= about 100 rpm.



NOTE 2: Each 1/2 degree of counterweight arm angle will change the full throttle level flight rpm about 50 on model 220 and about 100 on F200 propellers. If a change of 1/2 degree is made then there will need to be about one ounce of counterweight change. If your prop shop needs more details have them call me at 775 423 0378.



After the climb rpm and level flight rpm is brought to within 50 rpm of each other, they may be above rated engine rpm as shown in Fig. 5. It is then necessary to ADD weight as stated in note 1 above. Likewise if the rpm's are within 50 of each other, they may be below rated engine rpm. It is then necessare to REMOVE weight as stated in note1 above. (Problems 5 & 6)



Figure 7 below shows how to view the counterweight arm angle.










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